A Once and Future Peace (2021)

  • Documentary
  • 1h 35m

World Digital Festival Premiere

Closed-captioning available in English. Please click the ‘CC’ button on the bottom right of the player to activate

Presented in partnership with: Fair and Just Prosecution, Morehouse College Human Rights Film Festival housed at Morehouse College, Vera Institute of Justice.

In Seattle, communities are working to break the cycle of incarceration. A promising new restorative justice program based on Indigenous peace-making circles aims to bring healing to families and communities while reforming the justice system. Using beautifully crafted animation, the film follows “Andy,” a teenager facing felony charges, and his family as they work through the program shepherded by Saroeum, a former gang leader. As they look at the status of the broken justice system - prosecutors, judges, and those running the program ask: how much is our society willing to invest to truly change the trajectory of our communities for the better?

“When a young person comes into court, their attorney rightfully says ‘Don’t talk, I’ll do all the talking for you.’ When you come into a peace-making circle and this talking stick is in the hands of a 16-year-old boy, and all of the adults and everyone else in the room is leaning in to hear what he has to say – that’s a powerful moment.” - Daniel T. Satterberg, film participant, A Once and Future Peace

  • Thank you to everyone who joined our digital film festival screening + live Q&A on May 23. You can still watch the film at your own pace until May 27, and view the recording of the Q&A with filmmaker Eric Daniel Metzgar, film participant Saroeum Phoung and NYC Restorative Justice Manager at S.O.U.L. Sisters Leadership Collective Melissa Centeno, moderated by Lawrence Bartley, founder and director of “News Inside,” The Marshall Project, here on our Vimeo page.

We do not want the cost of entry to be a barrier for participation in the festival. If the price of buying a ticket to this film would prevent you from participating, please email the following address (filmticket@hrw.org) + you will receive an auto-reply email with a free ticket code. We have set aside a set # of tickets per film on a first come first-served basis. Once the free tickets are no longer available, the code will no longer work. For anyone that purchases a ticket, we appreciate your support. Your ticket purchase enables us to make tickets free for those who might otherwise be unable to watch. This also allows the festival to support the filmmakers for sharing their work in our festival and for the festival to cover the cost of hosting the films online.

Language(s)

English, Spanish

Subtitle(s)

English

Bonus Content

60 mins
'A Once and Future Peace' recorded Q&A

Sunday, May 23: Live Q&A for A Once and Future Peace by Eric Daniel Metzgar.

Conversation with filmmaker Eric Daniel Metzgar, film participant Saroeum Phoung and NYC Restorative Justice Manager at S.O.U.L. Sisters Leadership Collective Melissa Centeno. Moderated by Lawrence Bartley, founder and director of “News Inside,” The Marshall Project.

'A Once and Future Peace' Filmmaker Introduction

An introductory video from ‘A Once and Future Peace’ filmmaker Eric Daniel Metzgar

US: Probation, Parole Feed Mass Incarceration Crisis

Onerous Rules, Harsh Penalties Add to Jail, Prison Time

Probation and parole are promoted as alternatives to incarceration that help people get back on their feet, but instead feed bloated jail and prison populations in the United States, Human Rights Watch and the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) said in a joint report released July 31, 2020.

The report, “Revoked: How Probation and Parole Feed Mass Incarceration in the United States,” finds that supervision – probation and parole – drives high numbers of people, disproportionately those who are Black and brown, right back to jail or prison, while in large part failing to help them get needed services and resources. In states examined in the report, people are often incarcerated for violating the rules of their supervision or for low-level crimes, and receive disproportionate punishment following proceedings that fail to adequately protect their fair trial rights.

Read the report here.